Is Your Dachshund Lazy or Is It Boredom?

sampson-the-dachshund-getting-into-mischief

Although the Dachshund is a creatures of habit and loves to adhere to a routine, he/she also needs stimulation and exercise to avoid getting bored.

Boredom or Laziness?

A bored Dachshund is often mistaken as lazy. Because they are a true pack animal, they believe they are a part of your human family. And as such, they are very similar to human children.

When a child gets bored, they turn to occupying themselves or they whine. At times this may lead to them ‘getting into’ things they shouldn’t be touching. The same thing may very well happen with a bored Dachshund. He will start to keep himself occupied or whine when boredom sets in and they want attention. This will usually result in unwanted behaviors such as digging, chewing, barking or running away.

One very important thing to remember is that the life your Dachshund leads will influence his behavior. Frequent walks, play times, snuggles and rewards for good behavior will be stimulating and rewarding for your Dachshund. A happy, well loved Dachshund will be less likely to develop annoying and unwanted behaviors, and prevent them from getting bored or appearing lazy all the time.

Generally speaking, a young, healthy Dachshund that is not very active is probably bored and not lazy. Laziness is a trait you would expect to find in an older, overweight Dachshund.

Remember that puppies, a few years old or younger will nap a lot, just like a child, they need extra sleep. So don’t mistake that extra napping for boredom.

Preventing Boredom

There are quite a few things you can do to prevent your Dachshund from getting bored.

Have you ever noticed when you’re sitting on the couch that your Dachshund may take his ball, rope or toy and nudge it off and then look at you? It’s as if he’s saying, ‘Oops, my ball fell off the couch’. You pick it up and give it back to him. Then, he nudges it off the couch again. Then he gives you the same look. ‘Oops!’ Guess what? Your Dachshund is bored and he wants to play.

Though the Dachshund likes to play on their schedule, make sure your Dachshund gets plenty of play time. Consistently and frequently introducing new toys and rotating hes toys will keep your Dachshund’s interest peaked so he’ll want to play. Just like a human child, Dachshunds will get bored with the ‘same old toys’. We give Sampson a new toy every couple of weeks.

Your Dachshund also needs plenty of regular exercise. Take him for regular walks, play fetch with him in the yard or chase him around the house.

Another thing that we do with Sampson every opportunity we get is to take him along on errands or visiting with friends whenever possible.

Remember, a happy Dachshund is a well behaved Dachshund!